Tag Archives: passenger train

“The City of Los Angeles: Union Pacific’s Top-of-the-Line Streamlined Passenger Train”

Postcard photo of the streamliner City of Los Angeles near Sterling, Illinois and traveling along the Rock River. The train is pulled by a EMC E2 locomotive. The City of Los Angeles was a streamlined passenger train between Chicago, Illinois, and Los Angeles, California via Omaha, Nebraska, and Ogden, Utah. Between Omaha and Los Angeles it ran on the Union Pacific Railroad; east of Omaha it ran on the Chicago and North Western Railway until October 1955 and on the Milwaukee Road thereafter. This train was the top-of-the-line for the Union Pacific, which marketed it as a competitor to the Super Chief, a streamlined passenger train on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, and the Golden State, a streamlined passenger train jointly operated by the Rock Island and Southern Pacific railroads. As with the City of Los Angeles, many of the train’s cars bore the names of locales in and around its namesake city. Circa late 1940s.

“Seaboard Streamlined Steam Locomotive at the Seaboard Railway Station, St. Petersburg”

Postcard depiction of one of the finest Seaboard Air Line Streamlined Steam Locomotives at the Seaboard Air Line Railway Station at St. Petersburg, Florida, “The Sunshine City.”
This is a linen type card that was popular circa 1930s to early 1950s. Streamlined locomotives and trains began in the early to mid 1930s with the lightweight diesel trains such as the Pioneer Zephyr. By the late 1940s to early 1950s, diesel powered locomotives were in common use for passenger service. This card is likely from the 1930s to 1940s.

“The Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Texas Rocket”

The Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad Texas Rocket was a lightweight, streamlined diesel-electric passenger train built by the Budd Company and was one of six train sets built at the time. The six trains were the first streamlined equipment purchased by the Rock Island, as well as being its first diesel-powered passenger trains. Four of these trains consisted of 3 cars each, and the other two each had 4 cars. The stainless steel trains were each powered by an Electro-Motive Corporation 1,200 hp TA locomotive. Unlike many other early streamlined trains, the locomotives were not permanently attached to the trains. The trains were partially articulated, however the observation cars were not articulated with the rest of the train sets. The Texas Rocket ran from Fort Worth, Texas to Houston, Texas, 283 miles, and made one daily round trip. The Texas Rocket was the first long-distance streamliner to serve the state of Texas. Equipment included the following cars: An articulated 2 car set that was the 32 seat Baggage-dinette-coach No. 402 Dream Lake, 76 seat coach No. 302 Mesa Verde, and the 28 seat coach, lounge, observation car No. 452 Centennial. In 1938, the Denver Rocket was reassigned to Kansas City-Dallas service and the Texas Rocket was simultaneously assigned on the Kansas City-Dallas service so that Rocket service could be provided between the two cities. Like us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/railstream and visit our website http://www.classicstreamliners.com.

“The Astra Dome Domeliner on the Union Pacific”

The fine furnished cars and other amenities were the trademark of the beautiful streamlined passenger trains of yesteryear. The Classic Streamliners Facebook Page is a non-profit organization exploring vintage passenger trains, fallen flag railroads, train travel, rail museums, and just about everything else rail-related. They are on a mission to entertain, enlighten and educate all who climb aboard. Like them at http://www.facebook.com/RailStream.

“The Monon’s Classic Hoosier Club Lounge Car – Hoosier Daddy?”

The fine furnished cars and other amenities were the trademark of the beautiful streamlined passenger trains of yesteryear. The Classic Streamliners Facebook Page is a non-profit organization exploring vintage passenger trains, fallen flag railroads, train travel, rail museums, and just about everything else rail-related. They are on a mission to entertain, enlighten and educate all who climb aboard. Like them at http://www.facebook.com/RailStream.

“The Beautiful City of San Francisco Streamliner”

The City of San Francisco was a beautiful streamlined passenger train jointly operated by the Union Pacific Railroad, the Chicago and North Western Railway, and the Southern Pacific Railroad that ran between Oakland, California, and Chicago, Illinois, and connected by ferry to San Francisco. When it began in 1936, the schedule was 39 hours and 45 min each direction.

The Mighty Hiawathas of the Milwaukee Road

The Mighty Hiawathas of the Milwaukee Road

The Milwaukee Road aggressively marketed passenger service through much of its history, maintaining a high quality of service until the end of private intercity passenger operations in 1971. The Milwaukee prided itself on its passenger operations, providing the nation with some of its most innovative and colorful trains. The railroad’s home-built equipment was among some of the best passenger equipment ever run on any American railroad. The Milwaukee’s reputation for high quality service was the principal reason that UP shifted its service to the Milwaukee Road for its “City” streamliners in 1955.
The Milwaukee Road’s Pioneer Limited was one of the first named trains and its colorful Hiawatha trains were among the nation’s finest streamliners. The post-World War II Hiawatha trains remain a high-water mark for passenger train industrial design.

“The Firefly: Fast Frisco Streamliner”

The St. Louis – San Francisco Railroad (the Frisco) operated the streamlined “Texas Special” in a joint venture with the Missouri–Kansas–Texas Railroad (MKT or the Katy). This luxurious streamliner ran from St. Louis, Missouri to Dallas, Texas, Ft. Worth, Texas and San Antonio, Texas. The “Texas Special” has been a very popular prototype in model railroading. While the Texas Special was the most famous passenger train the Frisco ever operated, it also operated an entire fleet of named trains. These included: the “Bluebonnet” (also a joint venture with the M-K-T from 1927 to 1948 that ran from St. Louis to San Antonio); the “Black Gold” (Tulsa to Fort Worth); the “Firefly” (Tulsa to Kansas City); the “Kansas City-Florida Special” (Kansas City to Jacksonville); the “Memphian” (St. Louis to Memphis); the “Meteor” (an overnight streamliner from St. Louis to Tulsa and Oklahoma City); the “Oklahoman” (which once connected Kansas City to Tulsa but was later rerouted between St. Louis to Oklahoma City); the “Southland” (Kansas City to Birmingham); the “Sunnyland” (Kansas City via St. Louis and Atlanta to Pensacola); and the “Will Rogers” (St. Louis via Oklahoma City to Wichita).

“Streamlining Through Wonderful Florida”

The Atlantic Coast Line operated a fleet of crack passenger trains known as the Champions, between New York and the East and West coasts of Florida. These were some of the earliest and most successful streamliners in the business. In 1939, in response to rival railroad Seaboard’s popular new streamliner, the Silver Meteor, the Atlantic Coast Line launched its first streamlined train, the all-coach Champion. The railroad continued to maintain and improve its passenger service, even replacing old stations with new.